Entertain in style! DIY shibori napkins


It's no secret that I love a bit of diy, and I love shibori (or tie-dye as some may better know it as). I've had these shibori napkins on my to-do list for a little while now so it's about time I got down to it!

This is such a simple little diy but will add so much interest and style to your dining table when you entertain, and best of all, they'll be perfectly unique!

For these napkins, I've experimented a little more with different patterns than I have previously (see my blog post on diy tie-dye couch covers). There are so many different possible designs and it all depends on how you fold, scrunch and tie your fabric. You might like to do a little research before you settle on a design that you like. I've include 3 different design options below.

Just one or two things before you start... For the napkins, I pre-purchased mine but you could make these yourself. I chose navy blue dye as I hope to diy some tan colour leather napkin rings and I think the navy will look nice with the tan leather (but more about those in another blog post!)

WHAT YOU WILL NEED:

6 x white cotton napkins

Rubber bands in different sizes

2 x milk bottle lids

Bulldog clips

Paddle pop sticks

Bucket

Fabric Dye

Salt

Rubber Gloves

HOW TO:

1/

Remove any tags from the napkins and rinse in water – the fabric will be easier to fold and work with if it is damp.

2/

Fold and tie your napkins using a design of your choice or a design from the following:

DESIGN A: Fold the napkin into a rectangle shape and clamp along the long sides with bulldog clips.

DESIGN B: Fold the napkin into a large rectangle shape and clamp between two paddle pop sticks, fastened at either end with rubber bands. Space paddle pop stick clamps evenly across folded fabric. You will get a good result if the paddle pop sticks are clamped tight around your fabric. You made need to use two paddle pop sticks in each place on either side to tighten the clamp. I also clamped a chopstick on either side to tighten the paddle pop sticks to the fabric.